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Important information for TS240/T250 owners (Read 18758 times)
Alan Lambton
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Important information for TS240/T250 owners
28.11.2008 at 11:36:54
 
A focal point for information published in the past relating to the TS240/T250  (Partly a response to Paul's interest in the Team Sails tuning guide)

A.
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« Last Edit: 28.11.2008 at 13:50:40 by Nick »  
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Alan Lambton
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Re: The History Thread
Reply #1 - 28.11.2008 at 11:41:45
 
TEAM SAILS TUNING GUIDE Part 1

Trapper TS240 Rig and Sails

Rig set-up
The setting up of a fractional rig before initially sailing the yacht is of vital importance. The mast should first of all be adjusted to have a rake of approximately eight to twelve inches measured at the black band when a weight is hung on the main halyard. The length of the shrouds can then be compared using the main halyard extended and measuring to each chain-plate. This should be done with the backstay slack. The backstay can then be tensioned approximately half to give an even bend between the mast and the gooseneck of approximately three or four inches. The shrouds are then taken up until there is no slack and this will produce three or four inches of permanent mast bend when the backstay is released and this is perfectly acceptable for this type of rig. This is termed pre-bend. The lowers should then be adjusted as tight as possible with the backstay released but never quite as tight as the cap shrouds. Make sure that the mast is perfectly straight by looking up the sail track on the back edge.

Mainsail trim
The mainsail is the most important sail on the boat as the speed of the yacht is dependent on the correct setting of this sail. In the case of the masthead rig boat, the mainsail is small and the main driving power for the yacht comes from the genoas. It is therefore very easy for those owners converting from masthead to three quarter rig to ignore the importance of the mainsail and the flow controls that are available to them. The mainsail has to be continually adjusted for maximum speed in a wide range of conditions and is dependent on good trimming and adjustment. The adjustments that need to be carried out to ensure the correct setting of the mainsail are as follows:

Backstay – Using the backstay adjustment to increase fore and aft bend and flatten the mainsail enables the yacht to carry sail in heavier winds and also tightens the forestay and increases the pointing ability.

Luff tension – Luff tension is applied to the mainsail through the halyard and the luff cunningham. The backstay induces mast bend which tends to flatten the mainsail luff and allows the flow in the mainsail to move aft to the leech. Increasing the luff tension will return the flow to the forward part of the sail and free the leech for stronger winds.

Mainsheet – The mainsheet is used to control the amount of twist in the leech. The harder the mainsail is sheeted, the less twist and the tighter the leech will be. The basic rule is that a mainsail with a very tight leech will point high and a mainsail with a slack leech will foot well but not point high. The secret is to sheet the sail with the correct amount of twist for a given wind condition. In very light airs, the sail should be sheeted with a large amount of twist and this twist should be grossly reduced as the wind increases. In very strong winds the leech of the sail will open itself by application of the backstay and the bend of the mast.

Leech cunningham – If you have one of these, the leech cunningham should be taken in progressively or completely to remove the flow built into the foot of the mainsail and this has the effect of flattening the sail substantially in the lower regions. This will widen the slot between the genoa leech and the mainsail and will enable the boat to stand up to its sail better. The leech cunningham is an important part of the design of a racing mainsail although it may not be present on a cruiser/racer sail which is normally cut with a flatter foot.

Mainsheet traveler – It you have a mainsheet traveler fitted, this will affect the sheeting of the mainsail to the keel line whilst enabling the tension to remain unaltered. Leaving the traveler to lee will allow the yacht to sail more upright, usually at the expense of pointing ability. In light weather, to increase the twist in the sail, it is sometimes necessary to pull the traveler to windward and ease the mainsheet. In very light winds it is easy to over-sheet the mainsail and a continual watch should be kept on this. The leech should be allowed to twist by pulling the traveler into the centre of the boat or slightly to windward and easing the mainsheet and the kicking strap. It is important always to try and keep the leech tell tails streaming, particularly the top one. As the wind increases, the sail can be sheeted progressively harder and the leech twist reduced. In light weather there should be very little luff tension in order to keep the flow aft in the mainsail and the leech tight for maximum pointing ability.

Trimming for medium winds, 8 to 18 knots – As the wind strengths increase, the mainsail will have to be flattened with mast bend and the leech Cunningham. A considerable amount of luff tension may be required to keep the position of flow forward and the leech open. If the mainsail back-winding extends further aft than half way, then reefing or a headsail change should be considered. If the leech is allowed to trip by back-winding, the boat speed will drop considerably. The mainsail should always backwind evenly up its luff length if the genoa is trimmed correctly. A certain amount of backwind near the mast is acceptable.

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Alan Lambton
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Re: The History Thread
Reply #2 - 28.11.2008 at 11:43:38
 
TEAM SAILS TUNING GUIDE Part 2

Reaching – A fractional rig low aspect mainsail is very efficient on a reach. The rig is far more efficient than a masthead rig as it is possible to trim the mainsail in order to spill the wind whereas on a masthead rig boat the mainsail is so small and the spinnaker so large that excessive broaching will occur because the power cannot be eased out of the spinnaker. The key to successful trimming is playing the kicking strap and the mainsheet all the time. A lot of kicking strap tension will be required in strong winds to prevent the leech from over twisting on a reach. In gusty conditions the mainsheet can be given to a crew member to play and ease with the gusts.  This is especially applicable when close reaching with a spinnaker where too tight a kicking strap will prevent the mainsail from being dumped as the boat starts to broach. You will gather from this that it is important to let the mainsail go very early if broaching starts to occur and this should also be combined with easing the kicking strap.

Running – The mainsail should be set as full as possible with the main halyard eased until horizontal luff creases just appear. If possible the clew outhaul should be eased and the backstay should have no tension whatsoever.

Gybing – It will be found that running by the lee with a fractional rig is noticeably slower than tacking downwind, ie gybing the yacht to keep just off a dead run. Gybing should be accomplished by end for ending the pole and the person on the foredeck should be there for as little amount of time as possible as any weight forward of the mast will slow the yacht.

Genoa trim
The no. 1 genoa on the boat has been designed with a considerable amount of luff hollow cut into it to allow for the unavoidable forestay sag of a rig that does not rely on runners. The hollow in the genoa luff enables the sail to be kept flat throughout its range. However, in light winds, the shroud tension may keep the forestay over-tight producing a genoa that is too flat for the light conditions. To compensate, the genoa fairleads should be moved one or two notches further forward in light weather and the sheet eased to keep the sail reasonably full and the leech twisted. This technique requires experimentation but a very good rule is that the leech of the sail should follow the curve of the mainsail to maintain a parallel slot all the way up. If pointing ability is reduced then the genoa is probably over eased and should be tightened. As the wind increases, the fairlead could be moved aft and sheeted so that the leech is three inches or so off the spreader.

Luff  tension – The rule here is that the halyard should be tightened until any horizontal creases just disappear, however if the seas are rough or confused and it is paying to sail over each wave, then increasing the luff tension will draw the flow forward in the sail, open the leech and round the luff making the genoa easy to sail and increasing the speed of the boat.

Twist bands -  The twist bands that a sail-maker fits to the sail are an instant sail trimmers guide for depth of the position of the flow in the sail and are useful in ensuring that the genoa is not over-sheeted and closing the slot between the genoa leech and the mainsail luff.

No. 2 genoas and Jibs – It has been suggested that No. 2 genoas and jibs would be better used on yachts if the sheet position was moved outward onto the rail. This may in fact be the case in strong winds and flat water but in strong winds and any seaway, it is not so. In fact when the wind has become very strong in a seaway, it pays to move the sheet lead forward in order to make the sail, fuller to enable the boat to be feathered to windward over the waves. A boat with very flat sails in these conditions tends to be either heeled over and making leeway or pinched into the wind. In other words it is difficult to sail down a fine dividing line of maximum speed to windward when the sails are over-flat. It is easier to have more fullness in the sail and then be able to feather the boat to windward with the sails lifting.

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Alan Lambton
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Re: The History Thread
Reply #3 - 28.11.2008 at 11:46:24
 
TEAM SAILS TUNING GUIDE PART 3

Spinnakers
A working tri-radial spinnaker is the best all-round sail for the TS240 as it combines a very good reaching performance with a good overall spread of area for running and extra strength due to the tri-radial configuration. The radial head sail is more a broad reaching/running sail and will not close reach well. The tri-radial is cut with the design to enable it to be used as an all-round sail and the foot width is reduced in order to push more of the sail in plan view from behind the mainsail when running before the wind. It is also important to remember that with a tri-radial spinnaker, it is necessary to put the guy and the sheet fairly well forward and not have them running through blocks on the transom. The ideal system is to have them running through transom blocks but have snatch blocks to bring the sheet and guy level with the aft edge of the coachroof in order to get the most performance from the spinnaker.

In the case of setting the spinnaker on a Trapper TS240 it is of course essential that no crew member should go onto the foredeck and the spinnaker should be set from the leeward side of the boat under the mainsail or just under the genoa. It is very detrimental to performance to attempt to set the spinnaker from the pulpit. Another advantage over the pulpit hoist is that a spinnaker cannot fill when it is behind the mainsail and genoa until it is pulled round by the guy. There is therefore no possibility of the sail filling on its way up.

It is very easy to over sheet a tri-radial spinnaker because of the design of the sail which involves a smaller foot than crosswidth. Under no circumstances should the foot of the sail be pulled tight across the boat except in very strong winds when trying to prevent rolling. During racing someone should always be on the sheet and always trimming and playing the sail to keep it on the curl to gain maximum advantage. Do not forget to let the backstay go when running before the wind unless conditions are very strong and it is required to prevent the mast from going over the bow.

In closing I would point out that it is important to maintain boat speed through the water at all times when sailing a yacht of this type and that it is more detrimental to boat speed to over-sheet and try to point high than to sail free and fast to keep the boat moving. Over-sheeting is the commonest fault with both fore and aft sails and spinnakers on modern ocean racers and should be avoided at all costs.

Team Sails Limited
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Alan Lambton
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Re: The History Thread
Reply #4 - 28.11.2008 at 12:25:47
 
TS240/T250s from my old list   (And that are not on the current list)

I know some of these have changed hands, so I haven't included owners details.  I have a very old list with the first 40 boats built on it but most of the boats seem to have changed name and address several times since the list was made so I'll just include the following boats for now.

No.                      Name                        Date                       Location  (Last known)

6                         Tsarina                      1980                         Trallee

14                       Truant                        1980                         Southport

?   (T250)             Ocean Wave               1981                        Brixham

30                       Tiderip                       1982                         Norfolk Broads

36                       Silures                       1983                         Scilly Isles

37                       Vamoose                    1983                        Tipperary

40 (T250)             Cracker                     1983                         Malahide

?                          Ragtime Blues               ?                           Menai Straits

?   (T250)             Fantastic Mr Fox          1987                        Southampton

?                         Flashpoint                   2001 (completed)      Cornwall


(Some T250s here Nick!)

Cheers,

A.


             
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« Last Edit: 28.11.2008 at 16:57:40 by Alan Lambton »  
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Alan Lambton
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Re: The History Thread
Reply #5 - 28.11.2008 at 13:26:07
 
Keel Drawings

Overview of Hydraulic version




Keel Mod.




I've also got some more detailed (and massive!) drawings of the general arrangement of the keel and box.  I'll send them in sections to anyone who would like them, but it may take a while.

A.
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Alan Lambton
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Re: Important information for TS240/T250 owners
Reply #6 - 28.11.2008 at 16:09:54
 
Here is a bad copy of one of the original drawings dated 9/11/1979.


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Paul
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Re: Important information for TS240/T250 owners
Reply #7 - 28.11.2008 at 17:10:37
 
Hi Alan,

Thanks for all the very useful data!

The handwritten notes and sketch for modified keel imply that the keel twists in the housing but I always thought that the hardwood blocks on the inner face gave a sliding fit for keel with top 'box thus preventing twist.
The proposed mod with no top box would need to have 'aerofoil' or near this shape packing to give the sliding fit in many places or as a moulded in section.
The top box gives rigidity and a captive retainer for the cast keel which is not addressed in the proposed mod so a broken wire could mean loss of keel!!!
The modified keel would need to have some part of it upstanding within the housing and would probably put the centre of gravity up a bit as the (solid) cast iron would be somewhat heavier than the fabricated box,
Just a few thoughts.
Paul
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Alan Lambton
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Re: Important information for TS240/T250 owners
Reply #8 - 28.11.2008 at 17:39:21
 
Here are two more drawings.  My boat is a bit of a mixture of them both, as she has deep wooden pads bolted to the top of the keel each side to make the airofoil section fit the keel box - instead of the fabricated box.  The keel must be a bit heavier, but the weight is low down when sailing, so doing the right thing still.




And,




The wooden pads sit on top of the upstands on the retaining shoes when the keel is lowered, so it can't fall out (I hope!)

A.
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Re: Important information for TS240/T250 owners
Reply #9 - 29.11.2008 at 12:59:18
 
The T250 had a different accomodation layout towards the end of its production,




and a Collins Tandem Keel option giving it a draft of 3ft 1in. I've seen one of these - it does look odd!




Thanks to Godfrey for the photocopies.
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« Last Edit: 29.11.2008 at 13:41:05 by Alan Lambton »  
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Nidri240
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Re: Important information for TS240/T250 owners
Reply #10 - 02.12.2008 at 14:35:00
 
Excellent to see the keel sketches here, a great help to visualise the system. One thing that is not clear though, on the original hydraulic system, is it possible to remove the lower support shoe, or is it sandwiched between the hull and keel trunk? I was planning on replacing this area this winter, but if I need to hack it to pieces to remove, I might just find another way of freeing up the roller. Has anyone removed this member in one piece?

Giles
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Alan Lambton
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Re: Important information for TS240/T250 owners
Reply #11 - 02.12.2008 at 21:38:04
 
Sorry about the quality of this! Its a quick drawing I made when I had my retaining plates out.  These fit into a recess in the bottom of the hull and are faired in with filler.  I'm not sure if the original design had these plates - but the drawing showing the hydraulic arrangement looks a bit like it.  (The missing word at the bottom is Aft).




Cheers,

A.
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Re: Important information for TS240/T250 owners
Reply #12 - 18.03.2009 at 21:07:29
 
TS240 Trailer.



Tamsin looking very smart on her new trailer



Detail of Tamsin's new trailer.



Photos and trailer design by Steve (TSB240)
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« Last Edit: 18.03.2009 at 21:45:33 by Alan Lambton »  
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