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DIY Launch and Recovery (Read 4833 times)
Jonathan
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DIY Launch and Recovery
28.05.2013 at 16:28:16
 
I know the TS in TS240 stands for Trailer Sailer but I am wondering if many owners do a DIY launch and recovery. My club has hired a crane twice a year for many years but there is talk of this ending as a tractor and lifting cradle have been acquired. This is fine for bilge keelers which can dry out on a concrete slip but at present major alterations are needed to allow wet lifts.

I know originally a road trailer with a small launching dolly was available and regrettably I did not buy one when available some years back. I would be interested to hear of owners experiences if they launch and recover without a crane and how they go about it. I have a heavy trailer (not road legal with my car) but locating the boat over it in precisely the right position would be very difficult and as I would not be trailing it after the wheel bearings would be subject to attack by salt water.

I will be much interested in any comments
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Paul
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Re: DIY Launch and Recovery
Reply #1 - 30.05.2013 at 09:40:29
 
hi Jonathan,
At Dell Quay we are doing the crane lift and I winter store onto a road trailer which never gets wet and has to have paid for summer storage.
When we come in, the boats dry out on the shingle hard and I level Nautibuoy up with triangular wedges  approx. 900 x450mm to allow deck work etc.
Lift out is usually from afloat  to help get strop under but sometimes the tide beats us and the (tied to boat) wedges are used. 3or 4 persons can manhandle the boat (pivot on keel) to either side or fore and aft tipping to assist strops
Now you will say yes but that uses a crane!
Well it depends on your tractor/lifting frame set up but we have one club member with a lift keel (no bulb) who has a steel frame which I recall is like three braced 'goalpost ' frames with two(?) longitudinal runners. This demounts into shortish members which are bolted together to make the frame which is assembled prior to lift out.
For the TS 240 it probably is helpful if the height of the frame allows the keel to drop clear of the hull to usual water depth with keel up on mooring so that annual cleaning is easy.
The keel can rest on the ground or a suitable wood block. The advantages are that stored height is lower than trailer (keel held on trailer bed), the frame being demountable can be taken home and stored  ie no expense for storage.
I would imagine that your lift frame and tractor could handle the weight and height OK.
Hope this helps!
Paul
PS had first sail last Saturday (as I've been 'in dock') good to be back on the water!
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Nidri240
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Re: DIY Launch and Recovery
Reply #2 - 31.05.2013 at 06:45:29
 
Before I moved Nidri to Dell Quay, I used to launch and retrieve from the trailer. My trailer has removable docking arms that allow the boat to be positioned during retrieval. This was done on a small launch ramp by the quay at Bosham which meant that lines could be taken ashore to control the for / aft movement. The docking arms are well padded steel frames that bolt to the trailer and fit snugly against the hull when in the correct position.

Mine is really a yard trailer although I do trail it on the road to summer storage. I took the brakes out as they kept seizing. I also had to replace the bearings a couple of times, but that's not difficult.

As Paul says, at Dell Quay we beach all the boats and the crane picks them up and lowers them into their winter berth, be that trailers, cradles or simply chocks. This year I tried putting a couple of old tyres under the stern quarters as she dried out which worked sufficiently to allow a hoist from level. Not quite up to the job when it came to putting the mast up though!!

Giles
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TSB240
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Re: DIY Launch and Recovery
Reply #3 - 05.06.2013 at 11:02:48
 
We have DIY launched and recovered on our trailer. This is seroiously helped by having shaped bunks that match the hull shape at two points that locate the boat exactly fore and aft and level sideways.

I hate doing this into salt water as if you wish to maintain roadworthiness it is essential to dismantle the brake cables and repack the hubs each time.

If you are considering just winter storage I would make a frame up with self assembly steel work called unistrut. No welding rewquired.

This can then support two shaped bunks and be mounted on heavy duty castors with a swivelling A frame at the front  that can be connected to a towball on a tractor or car.

Simple solid rubber wheels would be ok for conctrete hard road ways. inflatable tyres would be needed for off road storage.

If the frame is open at the bottom then the keel can be lowered into a hole in dug the ground for servicing. In any event it is good practice to take the weight of the keel off the boat whilst in storage by lowering it onto a ground support.

Here are a couple of  links to pics of our trailer and shows the shaped bunks.

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/79352891/BILD1050.JPG

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/79352891/BILD1084.JPG

Bunks are just made up from Plywood and 2" square batttens
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Jonathan
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Re: DIY Launch and Recovery
Reply #4 - 11.06.2013 at 17:24:52
 
Thanks all for your suggestions. Definitely food for thought here. I already have bearers or "Bunks" cut to the hull profile but it never occurred to me that probably only the stern one is needed to allow strops under the hull so that has the merit of simplicity.

Unistrut also sounds good any suggestion where suitable castors can be obtained would be interesting. The ground in the club yard is pretty stony and the slip is rough so they need to be a good size. Last time I looked into this I came to the conclusion the prices were so high the crane was a good and simpler bet but that may not be an option much longer.

Maybe I should use the trailer - it never goes on the road so maybe it would not be too much hassle to repack the bearings. It is a two wheeler with land rover size wheels  so fore and aft positioning is important. The keel bulb sits on the central draw bar so side dock arms would be needed.

Any further suggestions gratefully received. You have all been more help than you might think - my background is a long way from engineering or construction so knowing where to turn for some of the solutions is not always easy even for a have a go DIYer.
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Fredster
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Re: DIY Launch and Recovery
Reply #5 - 07.04.2022 at 23:14:29
 
I feel like I'm flooding the forum recently. I have the time to do research on a few issues so I might as well use it.
I'm resurrecting this thread as I'm really interested in this trailer cradle "bunk" design but the images are no longer good.
Has anyone got these or otheirs to share. ?
Message me directly if that's necessary.

unistrut Sounds really interesting too as I need an a-frame for pulling the trailer/dolly
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Jonathan
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Re: DIY Launch and Recovery
Reply #6 - 08.04.2022 at 19:40:22
 
From what I remember of posts made by TSB240 he was using a fairly ordinary road trailer but adapted for the TS240. The hull was supported by what he called "bunks". In fact these were timbers cut to the profile of the hull. I see his post describes them as made of ply with 2 x 2 timber presumably between the two sheets of ply. I have seen other boats supported this way. From memory I think he had something wrapped around the edge of these "bunks" where the hull sat on them. A pity the old forum photos have disappeared. I am separately emailing you a photo of the timber profiles I have in use on scaffolding to raise the boat high enough to lower the keel - the principal for both scaffolding and trailer is the same I think. Mine are solid timber with two widths of about 2" with a gap between of about 1" and padded with dense foam rubber.
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