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Refurb of newly purchased 300 (Read 40173 times)
John Woodhouse
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Re: Refurb of newly purchased 300
Reply #135 - 12.01.2019 at 16:34:37
 
Thanks Stevie
I have been aboard quite a few T300s & not seen it before. Looks very smart.
On Star Trapper the original 'hockey stick' profile plastic gave up the ghost & I just sanded back the wood & re teak oiled.
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sr4a
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Re: Refurb of newly purchased 300
Reply #136 - 02.02.2019 at 21:31:54
 
Hi Folks,

Here's some more pics of the ongoing works on 'Carpe'
Hope the freaky weather isn't playing too much havoc where you are, up here in Scotland we call that a hard frost lol.
Anyways have fitted the holders for the boat hooks etc and also the teak strip the traveller was fixed to that was in poor shape.
I used Mahogany that I had in my workshop for the bases and 6 coats of marine varnish to protect the wood.
For the Traveller base I have used American White Oak as I have used in boat in other projects as it's good wearing in marine environment, retains it's good looks once treated and a hell of a lot cheaper than Teak or Iroko!!!
I have dry fitted the piece and will varnish in workshop now that it fits. (Used Wellnuts to fix to deck as it was only fixed originally with self tappers and will seal around holes with marine silicone.)


Anyways the pics....

The clips are the same for kitchen cabinet skirting board fixings and very pliable


Fitted



Finished


Here's the traveller 'dry' fitted, you can see our frost!!!
It's been screwed down with the 5mm A4 csk machine screws and the 20m wellnuts just go through the deck which, there, is 15mm thick, then pull up on underside to seal the hole but will marine silicone to seal all gaps on final fit.





Who's foot is that in bottom of pics??

Stevie
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sr4a
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Re: Refurb of newly purchased 300
Reply #137 - 22.05.2019 at 16:07:14
 
Hi Folks,

Been a wee while since posting.
Finally after 3 years of refit 'Carpe' is now afloat.
Launched last evening into the calm waters of the Forth with HMS Queen Elizabeth standing off in the firth as I motored out to my mooring.
Looking forward to some sea time now, will still be working on improvements and upgrades and will keep posting to you all.
Enjoy the sailing season folks, roll on the weekend...



Stevie †Cheesy
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sr4a
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Re: Refurb of newly purchased 300
Reply #138 - 22.05.2019 at 16:25:48
 
Hi Folks,

Here's the latest pics of inside 'Carpe'.
I still have the sink and 'fridge' covers to finish and the cabin table.
The cardboard is to protect the surfaces until I can decide on a runner or matting to protect the cabin sole
By the way what grease is used for the stern gland as I will require a tub at end of season?
Cheers,

Stevie















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Graham
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Re: Refurb of newly purchased 300
Reply #139 - 23.05.2019 at 15:23:20
 
I use Blakes seacock grease but I guess any waterproof grease would do.

https://www.marinestore.co.uk/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=SS...

I have a Trapper 500 with similar woodwork inside.  Would it be possible to describe your methods for renewing your wood.  
Eg abrasives  and products used, number of coats etc

The interior looks great.

Many thanks
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John Woodhouse
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Re: Refurb of newly purchased 300
Reply #140 - 23.05.2019 at 16:15:37
 
Stevie - a VERY smart looking T300. Well done on all your hard work.
You may just find as you start to sail her the work schedule just begins to take second place.....!
Re stern gland grease, I simply buy whatever brand the chandlery is currently selling. Must be 'waterproof' (what grease isn't?). Clearly important to regularly give the greaser a turn or two, until resistance felt.
John
PS I trust HMS Queen Elizabeth sounded a salute!
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« Last Edit: 23.05.2019 at 16:17:15 by John Woodhouse »  
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sr4a
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Re: Refurb of newly purchased 300
Reply #141 - 23.05.2019 at 20:55:40
 
Hi Folks,

Thanks for the comments John, I'll pick up some grease from the local 'swindlers' near the end of season, the tube is about 1/2 packed with grease still but previous owner didn't leave any tubs so wasn't sure if it was a specific grease. It seems to be a lighter type grease than the tub of Blakes that I have for the seacocks and I don't want to use that if possible cos of the price of blakes grease!
Don't know if 'Carpe' was a bad omen for the Captain of QE as he's been relieved of command, wonder if he fancies becoming my First Lieutenant, lol.

Graham, just strip your wood right back, I used 60/80 grit and sanded out any deep dents/gouges but be mindful if it's a veneer over plywood core. †I also used teaks plugs to fill any large holes and teak dust mixed with wood glue to fill tiny holes. Dust off as much as you can and then wipe over with a rag soaked in white spirit.
Dilute your first coat of varnish with ws, I start at 30% varnish to 70% spirit. Sand when dry with 120 grit and wipe again with rag in spirit, repeat 30/70 ratio if surface looks and feels pocked, I think the base coat is most important for the final finish so don't rush it.
Build up the varnish ratio 50/50, 75/25 until 100% varnish. Reduce your grit grade between recoating, I finish on 320 and then for final coat I use a light rub using green dish cleaning pads (scotchbrite I think is brand name). Warming the varnish or applying on a hot day really helps it flow smoothly. I use foam rollers to apply varnish and then lightly brush out edge to edge in a straight line with the grain then 90 degrees to it this eliminates any bubbles etc repeat this until you are happy no spots missed and before varnish starts to cure. (it's astounding how you can have areas where the varnish doesn't adhere to the surface and you only seem to find out when it's dry, I think the experts refer to them as 'holidays'?). Check and check again for any brush hairs on surface.
Keep the coats as thin as possible as I hang the surfaces vertically so no dust or insect will land on the surface and the varnish never sags or runs.
For hard wearing areas I have coated up to 8-10 coats but I like to apply at least 6 everywhere else.
The varnish I use is S/fix 'No nonsense yacht varnish'. Some wood on 'Carpe' has been varnished now for 2 years and though not at sea has been in a marine environment with winter and summer temps and hasn't show any signs of cracking, peeling etc and also has received the occasional knock during refurb and still looks like glass but time will tell.
Remember it's taken me 3 years but take your time and don't rush, depending on my schedule a hatch cover would take me an average of two weeks to varnish if I'm working on it nightly. Get as many surfaces into your garage to do at the same time and if on the boat ensure area is as dust free as humanly possible. A vacuum cleaner when sanding is your best friend!
I prefer an electric sander to hand sanding until last coat then using a scotchbrite pad by hand on the surface.
The pound shops sell foam rollers that you can chuck away when finished coating, the same for brushes, just make sure you check for loose hairs before using and during use.
Any badly damaged teak I've cut out and replaced with a fillet or replaced the whole piece with american white oak using original piece to profile new wood.
I plan to make duck boards for the bottom of the lockers to keep storage tubs/boxes up off the bilge if there's any water in there and make some shelving/ holders for dishes, mugs, maps and the likes. You can buy teak strapping of fleabay for some little projects over the winter months.
I'm no expert and some folks will have different approaches or methods †but as you can see from my pics the results look good.

Stevie †Smiley
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Graham
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Re: Refurb of newly purchased 300
Reply #142 - 23.05.2019 at 22:50:55
 
Thanks Stevie,

Great to have the detail on how it's done.

Graham
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sr4a
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Re: Refurb of newly purchased 300
Reply #143 - 31.05.2019 at 17:55:29
 
r

Here's HMS Queen Elizabeth squeezing by Carpe Diem last week on her way to Pompey. Carpe is the furthest out on mooring.
Good job skipper never scraped my hull or I would have got him sacked lol

Stevie † †Grin
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Defiance
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Re: Refurb of newly purchased 300
Reply #144 - 05.06.2019 at 20:39:30
 
Great picture. They mentioned the captain on Radio 4 today and the Navy press officer quickly changed the subject †Grin

Now youíre afloat how are you getting on with your solar set up? Iím thinking about about stealing your idea as itís quite a tidy arrangement.

Thanks

Nick
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« Last Edit: 05.06.2019 at 20:40:36 by Defiance »  
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sr4a
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Re: Refurb of newly purchased 300
Reply #145 - 21.06.2019 at 19:59:02
 
Hi Nick,

The set up was always there when I bought 'Carpe' i just tidied her up moved the panel to a more out of the way position replaced some wiring/ connections, made a mount and the rest is history.
I get about 1 amp per hour charging as it's only a 20 watt panel, that's enough for vhf, nasa instruments, gps and bilge, if needed, to run for when I'm out and by the time I return the following week the battery is fully charged again.
I do prefer the wind turbine system as we have more wind than sun but for a few years I will be learning how to sail before I feel confident to travel longer distances therefore battery power isn't an issue yet, so it really depends what you intend to do but one thing is if you're good at diy there's always a less expensive solution to simple problems than what the market will have you fork out for.
For next year I plan to fit the ACR system that charges all batteries when the engine is running, fit new seat cushions, paint top deck, gawd the list keeps growing lol

Stevie Cheesy
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