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selling my Trapper 500 (Read 305 times)
bluewatertrapper
Seaman Apprentice
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Love the water !

Posts: 15

selling my Trapper 500
29.12.2018 at 18:40:08
 
Hi my much travelled Trapper 500 Sarah is now up for sale. She is not standard, she has a carbon fiber transom hung rudder with a skeg. This frees up a lot of space in the cockpit, allowed me to fit a crude trimtab self steering gear and is far stronger that the original spade set up. In 2014 she took me to the Caribbean and back. I am just now fitting another gearbox and cutlass bearing. She is a bit scruffy, but still a strong and well proven boat. I think she is worth about 6000. She can be viewed out of the water at Canvey Island sailing club. My phone number is 07711135539.
Best wishes,
Max
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bluewatertrapper
Seaman Apprentice
**
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Love the water !

Posts: 15

Re: selling my Trapper 500
Reply #1 - 19.01.2019 at 21:01:49
 
The project continues. I took the engine out, unbolted the gearbox and took it over to my good mate Dave. He had a blown up Yanmar 35HP, as luck would have it, the gear box was exactly the same, even the ratios! A quick exchange was made, and I took the good box back and bolted it on. I replaced the cutlass bearing and repaired one of the engine mounts. The next stage was cleaning the engine bay out. Once that was done I reinstalled the lump. Today I fired it up, it all looks good. So I started clearing up the saloon. Someone is coming to look at the boat on Sunday, apparently he is very interested.

The whole exercise is bitter/ sweet, I am going to miss this boat a lot, we won a lot of racers in her, including her class at the Nore race ( the biggest in the Thames estuary) Then I took her to Portugal built her new rudder and then went to the Caribbean in her. I left the cape Verde islands on the 22 nd of November, I was advised not to go so early because the trade winds were not set in. And true enough, there was a big hole in the wind we fell into midway across, but the swells were still running. Sarah was able to sail and keep going using the pressure wave that is pushed in front of those big swells. We still made 80 miles a day even with no wind! A heavy boat wouldn't do that, but a Trapper can. So we arrived at my favourite Caribbean Island, Carriacou, a few days before Christmas. When it was time to go back, I wont pretend I wasn't nervous, the return journey is always harder, don't ever get complacent about the North Atlantic, she has the power! I had a satellite com that I could send and receive short text messages. My brother was providing me with up to date forecasts, and a week or so after I left the Azores he told me a strong blow was headed my way, he was right. The way that works best for Sarah in strong winds is to put the working jib up, roll half away, sheet it midships tight on both sheets, and drag a 300 foot rope off the stern. Like this she runs at about 3-4 knots before the waves, the noise eases down, the decks dry out and everything is rosy, as long as you have sea room. That is until the winds die off and the big waves get unstable... We did have a spectacular knock down at the end of that gale. I was in my bunk watching Lawrence of Arabia on my kindle when I heard the hissing roar of the breaking wave, a giant hand swatted us sideways and the contents of the sink landed in my bunk. Water was rushing past the companionway boards, and I knew the cockpit was full, she came up slowly, shook herself and carried on. There are not many boats that are good in calm waters as well as the lumpy stuff, fewer even that can thrill around the cans, and yet cross an Ocean. Trapper 500 s are very special boats, and I am going to miss mine.

Max Liberson.
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